January 2023

January 2023

Everyday, people interact with microbes in different ways depending on whether they are in urban or rural areas. The city/rural life influences microbial distribution and the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). For example, in urban areas, the use of public transit systems represents a reservoir of microbes for travelers. The different diffusion of antimicrobial resistance in urban and rural areas is influenced by various factors such as: agriculture and livestock in rural areas; domestic and industrial wastewater; the use of antimicrobials, hard metals and biocides, especially in the city; human and animal waste. The use of new technologies such as next generation sequencing and metagenomics have allowed to obtain a map of the global microbial distribution and their hosts and the spread of AMR. It has been shown that several non-human microorganisms have been isolated in cities, echoing important characteristics of cities and city life, characterized by a higher prevalence of resistance with new bacterial and viral species than in the rural environment.

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